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The House Law of the Princely House of Liechtenstein

Among other things, the House Law of the Princely House of Liechtenstein regulates the succession to the throne, the age of legal majority and guardianship issues.

The Princely House of Liechtenstein has been governed by its statutes for hundreds of years. Today’s House Law dates from 1993. It cannot be amended or annulled either by means of the Constitution of the Principality or by interstate agreements. Changing the House Law requires a two-thirds majority of all the voting members of the Princely House.

H.S.H. Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein and Hereditary Prince Alois
More information H.S.H. Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein and H.S.H. Hereditary Prince Alois

The Prince as Head of the Family

The Prince is Head of State, sovereign of the Princely House of Liechtenstein and Chairman of the Princely Foundations. According to the House Law, as head of the family the Prince watches over the “reputation, esteem and welfare” of the Princely House of Liechtenstein.

The Succession to the Throne

The House Law also regulates the succession to the throne on the principle of primogeniture. According to this, the firstborn son from the oldest line of the family always succeeds to the throne. Only if one line dies out does the next closest line to the family’s common ancestor take over. This rule of succession has applied since 1606. On the death of the head of the family, his eldest son takes on the responsibilities of Head of State, sovereign of the Princely House and Chairman of the Princely Foundations.

The Prince can nominate the adult prince who is entitled to succeed to the throne as his permanent representative, either in the event of temporary incapacity or in preparation for the succession. In the spirit of this early succession planning, on August 15, 2004, Prince Hans-Adam II appointed Hereditary Prince Alois as his permanent representative and delegated his sovereign powers to him.

"Clear and stable rules of succession are a big advantage for a hereditary monarchy. They are enshrined in our House Law and have proved their worth over hundreds of years."

H.S.H. Hereditary Prince Alois von und zu Liechtenstein