Skip navigation Scroll to top

Scroll to top

Decorations

There is a long tradition in the Princely House of Liechtenstein of recognizing outstanding service by bestowing titles, orders and honors. The Princes of Liechtenstein themselves have received many awards for their services over the centuries.

As Head of State, the Prince can bestow titles. The most common titles are: Princely Councilor, Princely Court Councilor, Princely Justice Councilor, Princely Commerce Councilor, Princely Education Councilor, Princely Spiritual Councilor. Aristocratic titles with the predicate “von” and the titles “Baron” or “Count” are very rarely awarded.

The Orders of Merit

The orders of merit encompass the following degrees:

  • Grand Star of the Princely Liechtenstein Order of Merit
  • Grand Cross with Diamonds of the Princely Liechtenstein Order of Merit
  • Grand Cross of the Princely Liechtenstein Order of Merit
  • Commander’s Cross with Star of the Princely Liechtenstein Order of Merit
  • Commander’s Cross of the Princely Liechtenstein Order of Merit
  • Knight’s Cross of the Princely Liechtenstein Order of Merit

The Medal of Merit

The Princely Liechtenstein Medal of Merit may be bestowed in silver or gold. The first Order of Merit and the first Princely Liechtenstein Medal of Merit were founded by Prince Franz I in 1937. More information can be found in the Princely Decree dated July 22, 1937, on the Foundation of the Princely Liechtenstein Orders of Merit and the Princely Liechtenstein Medal of Merit.

Recipients of Orders and Medals

The recipients of the Great Star, the Great Cross with Diamonds and the Great Cross are entitled to call themselves the "holder." Persons awarded the Commander’s Cross with Star may call themselves “Commander of the Order of Merit of the Principality of Liechtenstein with Star”; those awarded the Commander’s Cross may call themselves “Commander,” and those awarded the Knight’s Cross may call themselves "Knight of the Order of Merit of the Principality of Liechtenstein." No other privileges are associated with them. The decorations remain in the possession of the person to whom they were conferred and their heirs.